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IMPROVING HEALTH FOR VERY PRETERM CHILDREN IN EUROPE

Published articles

Sepcialist health care services use in a European cohort of infants born very preterm.
Seppänen AV, Bodeau-Livinec F, Boyle EM, Edstedt-Bonamy AK, Cuttini M, Toome L, Maier RF, Cloet E, Koopman-Esseboom C, Pedersen P, Gadzinowski J, Barros H, Zeitlin J; Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe (EPICE) research group. 
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2018 Dec 3.


AIM: Children born very preterm require additional specialist care because of the health and developmental risks associated with preterm birth, but information on their health service use is sparse. We sought to describe the use of specialist services by children born very preterm in Europe. 

METHOD: We analysed data from the multi-regional, population-based Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe (EPICE) cohort of births before 32 weeks' gestation in 11 European countries. Perinatal data were abstracted from medical records and parents completed a questionnaire at 2 years corrected age (4322 children; 2026 females, 2296 males; median gestational age 29wks, interquartile range [IQR] 27-31wks; median birthweight 1230g, IQR 970-1511g). We compared parent-reported use of specialist services by country, perinatal risk (based on gestational age, small for gestational age, and neonatal morbidities), maternal education, and birthplace. 

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Low breastfeeding continuation to 6 months for very preterm infants: A European multiregional cohort study.
Bonnet C, Blondel B, Piedvache A, Wilson E, Bonamy AE, Gortner L, Rodrigues C, van Heijst A, Draper ES, Cuttini M, Zeitlin J; Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe (EPICE) research group. 
Matern Child Nutr. 2018 Aug 23:e12657.


Breastfeeding confers multiple benefits for the health and development of very preterminfants, but there is scarce information on the duration of breastfeeding after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We used data from the Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe population-based cohort of births below 32 weeks of gestation in 11 European countries in 2011-2012 to investigate breastfeeding continuation until 6 months. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from obstetric and neonatal medical records as well as parental questionnaires at 2 years of corrected age. 

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Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants: results from the EPICE population based cohort
Jennifer Zeitlin, Bradley N Manktelow, Aurelie Piedvache, Marina Cuttini, Elaine Boyle, Arno van Heijst, Janusz Gadzinowski, Patrick Van Reempts, Lene Huusom, Tom Weber, Stephan Schmidt, Henrique Barros, Dominico Dillalo, Liis Toome,  Mikael Norman, Beatrice Blondel, Mercedes Bonet, Elisabeth S Draper, Rolf F Maier, and the EPICE Research Group
BMJ (2016)


Evidence-based practices are shown to improve health outcomes in children born preterm in randomised trials, but their use and impact in routine clinical practice remain poorly understood. We studied the implementation of high-evidence practices to assess whether they constitute a lever for reducing mortality and morbidity in children born preterm.

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Wide variation in severe neonatal morbidity among very preterm infants in European regions.
Edstedt Bonamy AK, Zeitlin J, Piedvache A, Maier RF, van Heijst A, Varendi H, Manktelow BN, Fenton A, Mazela J, Cuttini M, Norman M, Petrou S, Reempts PV, Barros H, Draper ES; Epice Research Group.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. (2018)


The study aim was to investigate the variation in severe neonatal morbidity among very preterm (VPT) infants across European regions and whether morbidity rates are higher in regions with low compared with high mortality rates.

This is an Area-based cohort study of all births before 32 weeks of gestational age. The cohort is composed of 6422 survivors to discharge from neonatal care units from 16 regions in 11 European countries included in 2011/2012.

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Cohort study from 11 European countries highlighted differences in the use and efficacy of hypothermia prevention strategies after very preterm birth.
Wilson E, Zeitlin J, Piedvache A, Misselwitz B, Christensson K, Maier RF, Norman M, Edstedt Bonamy AK; EPICE Research Group.
Acta Paediatr. (2018)


This study investigated the different strategies used in 11 European countries to prevent hypothermia, which continues to affect a large proportion of preterm births in the region.

We examined the association between the reported use of hypothermia prevention strategies in delivery rooms and body temperatures on admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in 5861 infants born at 22 + 0 to 31 +6 weeks of gestation. The use of plastic bags, wraps, caps, exothermic heat and mattresses was investigated.

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